Intense storm pummels Atlantic Canada

Intense storm pummels Atlantic Canada
Intense storm pummels Atlantic Canada
Environment Canada has special weather warnings in place for much of the province as the storm, an intense low-pressure system, moves over southeastern parts of the province to lie in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence later this afternoon.

“This low is giving strong-to-gale force east to northeasterlies into early this morning,” the statement reads. It goes on to note higher than normal water levels and increased risk for coastal flooding and ice rafting.

“You hear this term ‘weather bomb’ and it sounds like hype,” said Jim Abraham, a former Environment Canada meteorologist, blogger and long-time observer of storms who is based in Halifax. “But it’s actually based on science.”

“It does have the potential to be quite a historic storm,” Mr. Abraham said, adding that weather models began showing signs of it about a week ago. Named “Grayson” by U.S. weather networks, the storm is similar to one that struck Nova Scotia on a disastrous Groundhog Day in 1976. It, too, featured high winds and caused significant damage in coastal communities. “These are events that you might only see once in a decade or once in several decades,” Mr. Abraham said, adding that “storms are simply Mother Nature’s way of trying to balance the Earth.”

The storm’s rapid intensification, tree-bending winds and low-pressure system have given it “weather bomb” status, a term that is rooted in meteorological science despite its seeming alarmism.

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