Hundreds participate in the annual Run for the Cure in Barrie

Hundreds participate in the annual Run for the Cure in Barrie
Calgarians run, walk for breast cancer research at Run for the Cure
The following speech was delivered by cancer survivor Linda Trouten-Radford prior to Sunday's Run For The Cure in Downtown Guelph.

There was a time – if you peeked under my “hat” you would immediately realize I had cancer, but a cancer diagnosis does not define the person. We are people, fulfilling many roles, very much individuals with many talents. Cancer changes you, and I have learned a great deal walking this journey.

“It was pretty special to bring a positive spin to breast cancer but still acknowledge the struggles that everybody goes through,” she said. “I’m very lucky. It’s been 20 years, so I have a different perspective than some of the people going through cancer right now and I just wanted to bring that to everybody and remind them that there is always hope.”

It began with a routine mammogram in 2006. Each person walking the cancer journey has a story – every story impactful and personal. The first steps are draining – physically, emotionally, BUT no answers, YET. Challenges, challenges – sound familiar?

Francis certainly didn’t know that she would be diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 42, but now 20 years later, still a survivor and still thriving, she shared a positive message of hope to other women facing a diagnoses, fellow survivors, and everyone running to find a cure for breast cancer.

My story is really about the people who became and continue to be part of our lives. Aug 3, 2007 – we were scheduled to leave for Florida to view a shuttle launch AND find out the results of the surgery. “It's cancer.” At that moment time stood still and life changed – forever. This is part of what I wrote that day ——-

Time stood still, but life didn’t – We went home, broke the news to our son – got into our truck and headed for Florida. This story is about the compassionate people who made the experience in the midst of the shock, a lifetime experience. Upon returning, life was appointments and waiting. Always the waiting – as you try to grasp “normal”.

Before the run began, Francis led everyone in proclaiming that ‘today we run to make breast cancer beatable.’ No one knows what tomorrow may bring, so people continue to run and fight today, through good days and bad, until a tomorrow when breast cancer has been beaten.

The story now shifts to all those nurses, the unsung heroes, who day after day see the painful realities of cancer and yet do their best to make you comfortable and feel like the most important person in their world. Chemo was followed by radiation. I made a conscious commitment to embrace some version of normal each day.

“Thriving means you don’t simply survive, you take advantage of the time you have, you do what you want to do, you enjoy life, you get the most out of it, live for every day,” she said. “Because none of us knows what is going to happen tomorrow.”

No matter how much love and support you have, the journey is personal. You have to learn to cope – to draw strength, embrace your beliefs and carry on. You won’t always have “up” days, so accept that – crying is ok.

It is estimated that one in eight women in Canada will be diagnosed with breast cancer. In 2017, 26,300 women were diagnosed, making it the most common cancer among women. However, the five-year survival rate for women in Canada with breast cancer is now 87 per cent.

Time is precious, but there are a multitude of angels, making the journey easier by giving their time. The list is endless – helping us grasp normal through the difficult times – all so much appreciated. I am forever grateful for the sacrifices these people made – they are the focus of this story.

The years passed, and in 2015 those fateful words – you have metastatic cancer – in one spot – in your arm. I was given the medical advice to keep the cancer comfortable as it spread – it was after all metastatic cancer – I searched for other options. This story is about tireless researchers and groundbreaking advancements. You have a say in your medical journey – it is a team effort.

In 2016 my cancer treated arm broke, and was repaired – but the story continues. In May of this year that surgery failed and I endured extensive surgery to rebuild my arm with a cadaver femur. I am thankful to someone who signed a donor card and made this surgery possible. Life is meant to be lived – and I do celebrate each day and each milestone.

So this is who I am. If you “peeked under my hat” this is what I hope you would see – a woman with simple faith.  To all those who are walking this journey with us – thank you – and may God richly bless your lives. You have blessed ours.

Francis said for anyone facing a cancer diagnosis, it is important not to be overwhelmed, despite cancer being such a scary word. She spoke of her own experiences being diagnosed, but also about being a 20-year survivor.

I have purposely left out the day-to-day struggles of this disease, preferring to tell the overall story. Remember, a cancer diagnosis does not define the person. I am not the disease. This poem I wrote as a reminder, that we are not alone.

Hope is at the heart of every Run for the Cure. For Amelia Bobrowicz, who, along with members of Applause Productions, sang to welcome the Parade of Survivors, the run gives her hope.

It has been 11 years since I joined the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure in Guelph for the first time. Today we have the opportunity to join together in honouring our loved ones, and making a real difference.

Ontario has announced that once pot is legal, people can smoke it wherever smoking cigarettes is legal. What do you think?

The 22nd Annual CIBC Run for the Cure saw more than 500 people brave a cold Sunday morning to raise money and awareness for breast cancer.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

“I think if we help out and give support, I think if anything happens to us, we will have that support as well,” she said.

Runners clad in pink-feathered boas, tutus and spandex braved the chilly air and 9 a.m. start to raise money for breast cancer research on Sunday.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary for the 5 km or 1 km walk or run for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

“Breast cancer is something that unfortunately touches a lot of people in different ways and I think events like CIBC Run for the Cure really contribute to a future where our daughters and our daughters’ daughters don’t have to live in fear of breast cancer,” McGowan said.

Taylor Cassidy, who ran for the second time this year, was among them. Her mom is now in remission after having breast cancer last year.

“I find this year we’re not so much out here for my mom as we are for everyone else who might be going through it right now,” she said.

Thousands of runners and walkers take part in the CIBC Run for the Cure at South Centre in Calgary on Sunday morning September 30, 2018. Gavin Young/Postmedia Gavin Young / Postmedia

“Super inspiring to see all these people out here running for the same purpose,” Cassidy added.

Thousands of runners and walkers take part in the CIBC Run for the Cure at South Centre in Calgary on Sunday morning September 30, 2018. Gavin Young/Postmedia Gavin Young / Postmedia

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Thousands of runners and walkers take part in the CIBC Run for the Cure at South Centre in Calgary on Sunday morning September 30, 2018. Gavin Young/Postmedia Gavin Young / Postmedia

Lorrie Peers is a four-year breast cancer survivor who was misdiagnosed at the start. She said it’s amazing to see people turn out to the run in droves.

About 5,500 people braved the frosty temperatures Sunday morning to take part in the CIBC Run for the Cure, raising funds and awareness for breast cancer research.

“It does need support because it’s still attacking people so we need to find a cure,” Peers said.

“We always try and put an emphasis on survivors and their experience, trying to make the day special for them,” McGowan said.

Lorrie Peers, in leopard gloves, is a four-year breast cancer survivor who was misdiagnosed at the start.

Kym Evans, breast cancer survivor runs at Calgary’s Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

“Having everyone come out and support the event is showing me, and makes me feel hopeful, that we are moving closer to that.”

One out of eight Canadian women are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, according to Run for the Cure.

The day featured pink facials and pink manicures, along with a selection of baked goods, for breast cancer survivors.

Since 1992, the run has raised over $430 million for breast cancer research, organizers said. Last year, 80,000 participants across Canada raised $17 million.

“It went really well. It’s always an incredibly inspiring event,” said run director Kirsty McGowan.

The run is the largest, single-day, volunteer-led event dedicated to raising funds for breast cancer research, support programs, health education and advocacy initiatives, organizers added.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Lorrie Peers, in leopard gloves, is a four-year breast cancer survivor who was misdiagnosed at the start.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Kym Evans, breast cancer survivor runs at Calgary’s Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.

Hundreds turned out to Southcentre Mall in Calgary on Sunday for the Canadian Cancer Society CIBC Run for the Cure.