Brantford police investigating Halloween candy tampering

Brantford police investigating Halloween candy tampering
Unknown substance found in Brantford Halloween candy box
Police believe the contents of a package of candy was replaced with camphor in a Brantford neighbourhood. (Source: Brantford Police)

Police are investigating after receiving reports that a box of candy had its contents replaced with an unknown substance.

It happened in West Brant, specifically in the area around Blackburn Drive, Conklin Road, Shellard Lane and St. Patricks Drive.

Brantford Police say the package was a DOTS Assorted Fruit Flavored Gumdrops minibox which contained a substance believed to be camphor, which can be unsafe if taken orally.

Police said in a news release that the substance may have been camphor, an ingredient in topical applications, which can be unsafe if taken orally.

They say the package was a DOTS Assorted Fruit Flavored Gumdrops minibox which contained a substance believed to be camphor, which can be unsafe if taken orally.

New details are emerging in connection with three bodies found in a rural area of Middlesex Centre near the Oneida of the Thames First Nation.

Brantford police are investigating after a child received box of Halloween candy packed with a potentially toxic white substance instead of gumdrops.

Investigators say the child had been trick-or-treating on Blackburn Drive, Conklin Road, Shellard Lake and St. Patrick's Drive in Brantford's West Bank area where they picked up the package.

When the family returned home, the candy was checked and one of the packages — DOTS assorted fruit flavoured gumdrops — had the original candy removed, police said. In place of the candy were three small white cubes, possibly camphor — a terpene used in creams and ointments that can be unsafe if swallowed.

After the family arrived home, they checked over the candy and found a package of DOTS Assorted Fruit Flavored Gumdrops had been opened and filled with an unknown, cube-shaped substance before the lid was pushed back in place.

A child had been trick-or-treating in the West Brant area of Brantford, on Blackburn Drive, Conklin Road, Shellard Lane and St. Patricks Drive.

Health Canada says the side effects of swallowing camphor range from minor symptoms such as a burning sensation, nausea and vomiting to life-threatening reactions including seizures.

Police are reminding parents and caregivers to carefully check Halloween treats. If a package appears to be tampered with, contact police.

"We do take these incidents very seriously and we're continuing to investigate," said Const. Sean Seibert.

"We want to remind people to be vigilant and check their children's candy. If they do find something they believe has been tampered with, call police to investigate."

Anyone with information is asked call Brantford Police at 519-756-7050 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

It is a priority for CBC to create a website that is accessible to all Canadians including people with visual, hearing, motor and cognitive challenges.