Edmonton weather: Air quality advisory in effect as wildfire smoke blankets city – Edmonton Journal

Edmonton weather: Air quality advisory in effect as wildfire smoke blankets city - Edmonton Journal
Wildfire smoke prompts special air quality statement for Edmonton area
“Smoke from wildfires in northern Alberta is causing poor air quality and reducing visibility in some areas.”

A log smolders as fire crews work at the scene of a fire in Mill Creek Ravine, in Edmonton Tuesday May 28, 2019. David Bloom / Postmedia

According to Environment Canada, smoke from northern Alberta wildfires is causing poor air quality and reduced visibility in many areas around Edmonton, St. Albert and Sherwood Park.

Special air quality statement issued for Edmonton, St. Albert, Sherwood Park and surrounding areas

Thursday morning temperatures at the Edmonton Blatchford station measured 15.2 C with 11 km/h winds out of the northwest.

Residents could experience coughing, throat irritation, headaches or shortness of breath. Seniors, children, or anyone with lung disease are particularly at risk.

Environment Canada has issued a special air quality statement for Edmonton and much of central, north Alberta.

As of 8:20, the Alberta Air Quality Health Index had rated air quality in the Edmonton metro region at 7 out of 10, which is considered to be high risk.

“Smoke from wildfires in northern Alberta is causing poor air quality and reducing visibility in some areas,” the statement reads. “In central parts of the province smoke is expected to move back north by Friday morning as the flow shifts to southeasterly.

Anyone with health difficulties should stay in a cool, ventilated place with windows closed.  

“Stay inside if you have breathing difficulties. Find an indoor place that’s cool and ventilated. Using an air conditioner that cools and filters air may help. If you open the windows you may let in more polluted air. If your home isn’t air-conditioned, consider going to a public place (library, shopping mall, recreation centre) that is air-conditioned.”

Today: Mainly sunny. Widespread smoke. Wind becoming north 20 km/h gusting to 40 this morning. High 26. UV index 8 or very high.

Tonight: Clear. Becoming partly cloudy this evening. Local smoke. Wind north 20 km/h becoming light this evening. Low 11.

Here's an interesting look at the wildfire smoke in Edmonton from the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS) at the University of Alberta. The cameras record and store visual weather and river conditions every 15 minutes.#yeg #ABFire pic.twitter.com/8nYE7QoogC

Standing outside with Sophie + while the air quality is smokey and poor, Im 99% sure ash is is falling? Light, small flakes. Could this be @joshclassenCTV or @jessebeyerWX ? #yegwx pic.twitter.com/dCMtNmU3KI

Also, careful out there #yeg weather advisory due to the smoke in the area. pic.twitter.com/NaqkGi5XvY

#yeg the colour of the sun changed it might be the fire 🔥 up North off course it smells smoky 😞 pic.twitter.com/QYNLEAn8x3

Summer time….and your breathing is wheezy.🎶 Trees are burning, and the air quality index is high 🎶 Can't see the sun, but your uncle still thinks climate change ain't real🎶 #yeg #abfire #yegwx

Edmonton used to have four seasons: winter, more winter, less winter, construction. Now it has six: winter, less winter, spring (max 3 days), construction, smoke, winter again. #yegwx #yeg pic.twitter.com/9vFy8rlT35

Crazy smoky morning in #Yeg My thoughts are with everyone affected today. #staysafe #wildfire #smoke #iphoneography pic.twitter.com/DS3XnwrtuL

Environment Canada issued a special air quality statement on Thursday morning for Edmonton, St. Albert and Sherwood Park. 

"Smoke from wildfires in northern Alberta is causing poor air quality and reducing visibility in some areas," reads the statement from Environment Canada. 

Edmonton's Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) was at 7 or "high risk" as of 6:30 a.m. Thursday. 

The statement said "people may experience increased coughing, throat irritation, headaches or shortness of breath. Children, seniors, and those with cardiovascular or lung disease, such as asthma, are especially at risk."

Environment Canada recommends that people who have trouble breathing stay inside, somewhere cool and ventilated. 

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