Hamilton hosting vigil to remember family that died in Ethiopian Airlines crash – CBC News

Hamilton hosting vigil to remember family that died in Ethiopian Airlines crash - CBC News
Toronto man, 72, identified as Canadian victim of Ethiopia plane crash
There will be a public vigil in Hamilton this weekend to remember a local family of five — including a nine-month-old baby and her two siblings — who died in the Ethiopian Airlines crash.

Nine-month-old Rubi Wangui Njuguna was killed in the March 10 crash, as was her 60-year-old grandmother Ann Wangui Karanja, her 34-year-old mother Carolyne Karanja, her seven-year-old brother Ryan and her sister Kelly, who was four.

A 9-month-old girl from Hamilton was among the 18 Canadian victims. As reported by the Star, Quindos Karanja said 9-month-old Rubi Paul was travelling to Kenya with her mother, grandmother and older siblings to meet Karanja — her grandfather — for the very first time. Paul’s 60-year-old grandmother, Ann Wangui Karanja, her 34-year-old mother Carolyne Karanja, and her siblings, 7-year-old Ryan and 4-year-old Kerri were also on board. The baby girl, born in Canada, was the only one with Canadian citizenship in the family.

Carolyne Karanja and her children had lived in Hamilton since 2014. Her mother had come to visit in August for three months but extended her stay. 

A 9-month-old girl from Hamilton was among the 18 Canadian victims. As reported by the Star, Quindos Karanja said 9-month-old Rubi Paul was travelling to Kenya with her mother, grandmother and older siblings to meet Karanja — her grandfather — for the very first time. Paul’s 60-year-old grandmother, Ann Wangui Karanja, her 34-year-old mother Carolyne Karanja, and her siblings, 7-year-old Ryan and 4-year-old Kerri were also on board. The baby girl, born in Canada, was the only one with Canadian citizenship in the family.

Video: Ethiopian Airlines: Mourning the crash victims – BBC News

The family was heading to Kenya to see Carolyne Karanja's father, Quindos, who would meet his granddaughter for the first time.

So far, Canada has no official plans to ground Boeing 737 Max 8 planes. Federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau told reporters in Montreal on Tuesday that Canada was still gathering information and had no immediate plans to ground the Boeing airliner. Canada’s airlines confirmed they were still flying the Max 8 aircraft Tuesday afternoon.

The vigil will not only honour the Karanja family, but the 157 victims who died in the crash, the Kenyan Community in Ontario said in a statement.

So far, Canada has no official plans to ground Boeing 737 Max 8 planes. Federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau told reporters in Montreal on Tuesday that Canada was still gathering information and had no immediate plans to ground the Boeing airliner. Canada’s airlines confirmed they were still flying the Max 8 aircraft Tuesday afternoon.

"This tragedy transcends regions and national borders, affecting people from multiple nations both in Canada and across the globe," it said in a notice about the vigil. "The Kenyan community is extremely devastated by this catastrophic and heart wrecking event."

The Ethiopian Airlines plane went down moments after takeoff from Addis Ababa's airport Sunday, killing all 157 passengers and crew on board, including 18 Canadians.

China’s civilian aviation authority has ordered all Chinese airlines to temporarily ground their Boeing 737 Max 8 planes following the crash, amid safety concerns because of its resemblance to the Indonesian crash in October of last year. The Civil Aviation Administration of China said the order took effect at 6 p.m. on Monday.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said Wednesday that the deaths were tragic regardless of where the 157 people were from. But some of them being from Hamilton made it a little more personal.

Ethiopian Airlines confirmed all 157 people — 149 passengers and eight crew on board — were killed when the plane crashed six minutes after takeoff from Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Eighteen of those victims were Canadian citizens, although several others were foreign nationals living in Canada.

Local teacher Dawn Tanner also died in the crash. Tanner, 47, was the department head for the special education program at Hagersville Secondary School.

Ethiopian Airlines confirmed all 157 people — 149 passengers and eight crew on board — were killed when the plane crashed six minutes after takeoff from Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Eighteen of those victims were Canadian citizens, although several others were foreign nationals living in Canada.

Samantha Craggs is a CBC News reporter based in Hamilton, Ont. She has a particular interest in politics and social justice stories, and tweets live from Hamilton city hall. Follow her on Twitter at @SamCraggsCBC, or email her at [email protected]

Kosha Vaidya, 37, her husband, Prerit Dixit, 45, their daughters, Ashka Dixit, 14, and Anushka Dixit, 13, and his parents Pannagesh Vaidya, 73, and Hansini Vaidya, 68, were also among the victims. Manant Vaidya, brother of Kosha Vaidya, told the Star that the Brampton family was travelling on a March break trip to Kenya.

TORONTO — A 72-year-old Toronto man was identified Wednesday as one of the Canadian victims of the plane crash in Ethiopia.

Kosha Vaidya, 37, her husband, Prerit Dixit, 45, their daughters, Ashka Dixit, 14, and Anushka Dixit, 13, and his parents Pannagesh Vaidya, 73, and Hansini Vaidya, 68, were also among the victims. Manant Vaidya, brother of Kosha Vaidya, told the Star that the Brampton family was travelling on a March break trip to Kenya.

The Ismaili Centre said Ameen Noormohamed was on board the Ethiopian Airlines plane that went down on Sunday moments after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 passengers and crew.

By Tuesday, much of the world, including the entire European Union, grounded the Boeing jetliner involved in the Ethiopian Airlines crash or banned it from their airspace, leaving the Canada and the United States as two of the few remaining operators of the plane involved in two deadly accidents in six months.

"We understand that members of the deceaseds family have made their way to Kenya and are in the midst of making arrangements," the centre said in a statement.

The youngest was a nine-month-old baby girl — the only Canadian citizen in her family — who was travelling with her mother, grandmother and two older siblings to meet her grandfather in Kenya for the first time. Rubi Pauls grandfather said he was struggling to accept the devastating loss of much of his family.

Stéphanie Lacroix, 25, of Timmins, Ont., was also on board the flight. She was a board member of the African Community Fund for Education Canada and previously volunteered with Free the Children. According to her LinkedIn profile, she was also working with the United Nations Association in Canada.

A Brampton, Ont., family was also mourning six of its members who had been on their way to enjoy a safari in Kenya. Two teen sisters — 13-year-old Anushka Dixit and 14-year-old Ashka — their mother, Kosha Vaidya, 37, and father, Prerit Dixit, 45, were killed. The girls grandparents, who were believed to be Indian citizens, were also killed in the crash.

Stéphanie Lacroix, 25, of Timmins, Ont., was also on board the flight. She was a board member of the African Community Fund for Education Canada and previously volunteered with Free the Children. According to her LinkedIn profile, she was also working with the United Nations Association in Canada.

A Hamilton-area family, meanwhile, was mourning a special education teacher who had a passion for volunteering with the vulnerable. Cody French said his mother, Dawn Tanner had been travelling to visit friends in Kenya.

A number of other victims had been travelling to a United Nations Environment Assembly in Nairobi when their Ethiopian Airlines flight went down.

Edmonton native Darcy Belanger, 46, was also on his way to the United Nations Environment Assembly in Nairobi when his plane crashed. He was attending the assembly as part of his volunteer work with Parvati.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to the environmental and social welfare of the planet.

Micah Messent, Danielle Moore and Angela Rehhorn and Darcy Belanger were all slated to attend the conference through various humanitarian or conservation organizations.

Other victims included Stephanie Lacroix, who was working with the United Nations Association in Canada, and career aid worker Jessica Hyba, who was employed by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees.

Forestry advocate Peter deMarsh of New Brunswick, Carleton University literature professor Pius Adesanmi, Calgary accountant Derick Lwugi, and a mother and daughter from Edmonton — Amina Ibrahim Odowa and five-year-old Sofia Faisal Abdulkadir — were also killed in the crash.