Activists glue themselves to London Stock Exchange in climate change protest – Global News

Activists glue themselves to London Stock Exchange in climate change protest - Global News
Climate-change protesters glue themselves to the London Stock Exchange
LONDON – More than 300 environmental activists sowed chaos through London‘s financial district on Thursday, gluing themselves to the stock exchange and blocking roads outside the Bank of England and major banks such as Goldman Sachs.

The Extinction Rebellion group has spent 11 days disrupting London in a bid to force Britain to act to help avert what they cast as a climate cataclysm.

Demonstrators have caused considerable upheaval since arriving in the capital last Monday, as part of an international effort to force the government to take action on climate change.

On Thursday, they turned their attention to London‘s financial institutions and the city — home to more international banks than any other and the global centre for foreign exchange trading.

Organisers have said they will "voluntarily end" their occupation of the two remaining strongholds of Marble Arch and Parliament Square at 5pm on Thursday.

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In streets beside the Bank of England, around 20 activists blocked the road singing Bob Marley’s “One Love.” Police removed one woman who glued her breasts to the road outside Goldman Sachs European headquarters on Fleet Street.

One organiser told the Daily Telegraph: "Its going to be quite significant – there is going to be all sorts going on, its going to be very, very busy."

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Protester Diana Warner glues her hand to a train as demonstrators block traffic at Canary Wharf Station during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

The Extinction Rebellion group last night said it would relinquish its grip on two of the capitals busiest roads, but hinted more action would soon follow.

A protester wears a protective mask put by the police as they attempt to remove protective casing in which a she has put her hand, as protesters block traffic at Fleet Street during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

It is understood the next round of chaos could come as soon as this morning – targeting bankers and business chiefs in the City of London at rush hour. 

Boulton, Boris and Brendan, you are responsible for this climate crisis

Protesters block traffic outside The Bank of England during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

The activists said in a statement: "We will leave the physical locations but a space for truth-telling has been opened up in the world.

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A man takes part in a demonstration at the London stock exchange during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

More than 1,000 people were arrested after refusing to leave blockades on Waterloo Bridge, Oxford Circus, Parliament Square and Marble Arch.

Demonstrators glue their hands to the London stock exchange during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

Demonstrators block traffic at Fleet Street during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

"We would like to thank Londoners for opening their hearts and demonstrating their willingness to act on that truth.

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Climate protesters are seen in front of HM Treasury in Westminster during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019.

They brought traffic to a halt and triggered a major police response after camping on roads through the day and night. 

Video: Climate activists block London stock exchange and disrupt trains

The hand of a demonstrator is seen glued to a wall of the London stock exchange during an Extinction Rebellion protest in London, Britain April 25, 2019. REUTERS/Simon Dawson

The London protests were part of a wider network of disruption across the globe, spanning 80 cities in 33 countries. 

The Life-Changing Power Of Extinction Rebellion

Lying on the ground outside Goldman, one activist held a placard saying “No jobs on a dead planet” while others chanted: “What do we want? Climate justice. When do we want it? Now.”

However, giving a cryptic hint of what was to come, the statement added: "Expect more actions very soon."

In Canary Wharf, five protesters from the group climbed aboard a train at the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) station and unfurled a banner which read: “Business as usual = Death.” One glued herself to a train.

Boris Johnson has been at it in his Telegraph column, again (Credit: Christopher Furlong) On Tuesday the Telegraph published Johnsons weekly column in which he launched another attack on XR, describing the group as “smug, irritating and disruptive.” Skirting around the issue of an impending climate catastrophe, he recommends “taking your boat to China” for an alternative. Evading responsibility as opposed to scrutinising your own performance.

“I’m here because I have a belief that there is something greater than us, which tells me that we don’t own this earth,” said Phil Kingston, a retired parole officer who celebrated his 83rd birthday by climbing on top of the train during rush hour.

The green movement in its wider setting demands more than environmental action. It calls for collective consciousness, a curbing of GDP growth and an interrogation on mass-consumption and production. It asks for increased regulations to guide us in making more ecological and sustainable choices. It asks to dismantle and wane the strong forces of masculinity, whose desire for mastery and machinery has led to the destruction of the environment.

READ MORE: Extreme weather, including widespread spring flooding, is ‘new reality’ of climate change: Trudeau

More than halfway through the Extinction Rebellion (XR) protests and it seems a poignant moment to reflect on what weve seen so far: over 1,000 people arrested trying to communicate the message of climate breakdown, 16-year-old Greta Thunberg speaking more sense in parliament than its members, that the might of the British police force can be tickled by a giant pink boat and some superglue.

At the London Stock Exchange‘s headquarters, seven protesters dressed in black suits and red ties were blocking the revolving doors of the building. They held signs reading “Tell the truth” and “You cant eat money.”

A less articulated moment but still brought into focus is the grand failure of the British tabloids and broader media. Weve seen them denying the reality of ecological collapse and the role the United Kingdom government has played in fuelling this. Coverage has been saturated by denouncing climate loons rather than scrutinising the government and climate science accordingly.

The activists also held protests outside other banks including Rothschild, Nomura, Deutsche Bank. Eight protesters glued themselves together with their arms around the handrail to the Treasury, according to a Reuters photographer at the scene.

With largely peaceful stunts — such as blocking some of London‘s most iconic locations, smashing a door at the Shell building and shocking lawmakers with a semi-nude protest in parliament — the group has garnered massive publicity.

Extinction Rebellion advocates non-violent civil disobedience to force governments to reduce carbon emissions and avert what it says is a global climate crisis that will bring starvation, floods, wildfires and social collapse.

Rather than an intellectual assessment of the movements aims, Boultons visceral disdain for Boardmans piety brought institutional contempt into sharp view. Sky may portray itself as an environmental ally, see the rotating coverage of its Ocean Rescue campaign, but this interview illuminated the perennial institutional prejudice found in the British press.

Police said 1,130 arrests had been made since the main protests began. The final day of protests is focusing on the international financial sector, which has made London its home.

The UK ranks fifth in terms of the countries with the largest cumulative CO2 emissions since 1750. We have historically exploited the Global South for the sake of progress. We are set to miss our emissions reduction target. Last year our government pushed fracking and a Heathrow expansion. Gove tried to get climate change off the syllabus years ago.

“So were here today to highlight that there are people and businesses trading in ecological destruction in that building behind us,” Adam Woodhall, a 48-year-old spokesman for the group, said outside the London Stock Exchange.

Denying climate change outright is now dangerous territory, considering there is a 98 per cent consensus from the scientific community that it is here and human-caused. Rather, media outlets have used alternative artillery to delegitimise the environmental movement. There have been insults, finger-pointing and bigotry.

“We want the people in this building and around the world that in the financial industry to understand the impact that they are having on our futures. They are trading and making money in our futures.”

Time for perspective. Who are the real “middle class, self-indulgent people who want to tell us how to live our lives.” What makes this boys club so terrified of this new spate of non-violent protests? What makes the elephant fear the mouse? The answer is logical and its not about climate change.

The group is demanding the government declare a climate and ecological emergency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025 and create a citizen’s assembly of members of the public to lead on decisions to address climate change.

Whilst the refrain from addressing climate change is expected, his recent piece is morally repugnant. He writes a scathing account of 16-year old-activist Greta Thunberg that does not need repeating, before taking aim at Extinction Rebellion for employing the “politics of fear.”

Extinction Rebellion protesters glue themselves to London Stock Exchange

In 2017, total United Kingdom greenhouse gas emissions were 43 per cent lower than in 1990 and 2.6 per cent lower than 2016, according to government statistics.

Animation: The countries with the largest cumulative CO2 emissions since 1750Ranking as of the start of 2019:1) US – 397GtCO22) CN – 214Gt3) fmr USSR – 1804) DE – 905) UK – 776) JP – 587) IN – 518) FR – 379) CA – 3210) PL – 27 pic.twitter.com/cKRNKO4O0b

The group said they would end their protests in London on Thursday and would end their blockades at Parliament Square and Marble Arch.

Sticking it to the man: Climate change protesters glue themselves to London Stock Exchange (VIDEO)

However, they promised more protests in the future, saying direct action was the only way to bring the issue to public attention.

Environmental activists glued themselves to the London Stock Exchange and climbed onto the roof of a train at Canary Wharf on the final day of protests aimed at forcing Britain to take action to avert what they cast as a global climate cataclysm.

A retired parole officer in his eighties was among a number of climate change protesters arrested today after climbing on top of a train in London during the morning rush hour.

The Extinction Rebellion group has caused mass disruption in recent weeks across London, blocking Marble Arch, Oxford Circus and Waterloo Bridge, smashing a door at the Shell building and shocking lawmakers with a semi-nude protest in parliament.

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At the London Stock Exchange's headquarters, six protesters dressed in black suits and red ties were blocking the revolving doors of the building. They held signs reading "Tell the truth" and "You can't eat money."

Extinction Rebellion: Climate change activists to target Londons financial district for final swarming protest

At the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) station in Canary Wharf, five protesters from the group climbed aboard a train and unfurled a banner which read: "Business as usual = Death." One glued herself to a train.

"Its bizarre we have to do this in order for governments to listen to the scientists," said Diana Warner, 60, who glued her hand to the train.

"I've got children who are grown up so I can do this, so I'm doing it for everyone who can't," Warner said.

In the past 11 days, the group has brought iconic parts of central London to a standstill in what activists have described as the biggest act of civil disobedience in modern British history.

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Police said 1088 arrests have been made since the main protests began. The final day of protests is focusing on the international financial sector, which has made London its home.

"Extinction Rebellion to focus on the financial industry today," the group said in a statement. The "aim is to demand the finance industry tells the truth about the climate industry and the devastating impact the industry has on our planet."

Extinction Rebellion shutdown London Stock Exchange and Canary Wharf – Daily Star

The group advocates non-violent civil disobedience to force governments to reduce carbon emissions and avert what it says is a global climate crisis that will bring starvation, floods, wildfires and social collapse.

The group is demanding the government declare a climate and ecological emergency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025 and create a citizen's assembly of members of the public to lead on decisions to address climate change.

Extinction Rebellion protesters to stage die-in at Tate Modern

In 2017, total United Kingdom greenhouse gas emissions were 43 per cent lower than in 1990 and 2.6 percent lower than 2016, according to government statistics.

Extinction Rebellion climate group calling it quits on London protests

The group said they will end their protests in London on Thursday and will end their blockades at Parliament Square and Marble Arch.

Extinction Rebellion protesters arrested after climbing on top of DLR train at Canary Wharf

However, they promised more protests in the future, saying direct action was the only way to bring the issue to public attention.

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