Ocean blob returns to BCs North Coast

Ocean \blob\ returns to BC\s North Coast
Long-range update and the return of the blob
While it may seem like an odd term, meteorologists say that “the blob” may have devastating effects.

What’s more, another “blob” has been spotted again in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of B.C.

When the Blob tends to stick around, as it did during the winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, it forces the jet stream to the north — bringing unusually dry and warm conditions to the West and, as the jet stream crashes back down, extremely cold and stormy conditions to the East. Whether or not this current iteration haunting the West Coast will stick around (its 2015 variant hung on for a full year) is up for debate, but Mass sees some hope.

Last seen in 2016, the phenomenon takes place when a large area of the ocean warms up, which creates a warm patch, or as it is known, a “blob.”

Sadly, this anomalous occurrence is thought to be the culprit for a number of negative changes in the ocean. For example, some scientists have linked the event with a decline in fish populations as well as the subsequent death of cetaceans.

“After a brief resurgence in September 2016, the blob faded away, until October 2018, where signs are emerging of its triumphant return,” reports the Weather Network.

The culprit for its formation this year is likely an area of high pressure that has persisted over the Gulf of Alaska. This has not only kept the region unusually warm, but also delayed the typical snowy weather that comes in the fall. In Fairbanks, theyve yet to see any snow –– the latest on record.

What’s more, the phenomenon may have an effect on the weather, too. Specifically, meteorologists claim that it may be indicative of poor snowfall, which has negative ramifications for B.C. ski resorts.

The Blob is a large mass of relatively warm water that forms in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of North America. First detected in 2013, it appears as a very pronounced blob of red, orange or yellow on sea surface temperature maps.

Alaskas unseasonably warm weather is a result of the blob – a period of high pressure over the states coast. 

This dome of warm air has stunted the progression of autumn and seen the state cling to the remnants of summer.

The all-powerful “Blob” of the Northwest Pacific is back — and its come to wreck havoc on winter weather forecasts across the United States.

Unusual weather patterns have extended beyond the air temperature and has spread to the ocean, with an area of warm water found in the usually frigid north Pacific waters. 

Michael d'Estries ( @michaeldestries ) covers science, technology, art, and the beautiful, unusual corners of our incredible world.

Alaskas unseasonably warm weather is a result of the blob – a period of high pressure over the states coast. Previous iterations of the blob have appeared and had significant impacts on the Lower 48

Scientists are unsure how long the blob will remain in place and the consequences it may have on the weather for the contiguous 48 states. 

Previous experience says the blob causes unseasonably warm and dry conditions in the West and cold and stormy conditions in the East. 

This is a result of the high pressure area in the Gulf of Alaska causing the jet stream to rise above the blob.

A wall of high pressure gathers around the northwestern states and brings warm weather while blocking storms.

It is believed the Californian drought of 2013-2015 was partly caused by one of the blobs predecessors. 

Previous experience says the blob causes unseasonably warm and dry conditions in the West and cold and stormy conditions in the East. This is a result of the high pressure area in the Gulf of Alaska causing the jet stream to rise above the blob 

The National Weather Service on Thursday predicted a warmer than normal winter for the northern and western three-quarters of the nation. 

The greatest chance for warmer than normal winter weather is in Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, Montana, northern Wyoming and western North Dakota.

How long will BLOB Jr. last? At least as long as we have persistent high pressure over the north Pacific, wrote Cliff Mass, a professor of atmospheric science at the University of Washington, in a blog post.

Professor Mass added: It looks like things are evolving to a pattern with less high pressure offshore, so the BLOB should weaken.