Child poverty targeting by Regina Doherty not enough

Child poverty targeting by Regina Doherty not enough
Disharmony at Church of Ireland school in Greystones regrettable, synod told
Google said on Monday it would shut down the consumer version of Google+ and tighten its data-sharing policies after a bug potentially exposed user data. Photograph: iStock

The data protection regulator Helen Dixon said on Tuesday that she was not aware of the data breach that led to Googles decision to shut down the consumer version of its failed social network Google+.

Many may find fault with such a description, may even recoil from it – in the spirit of Oscar Wilde who when asked if he had any religious belief replied: I dont think I have any. I am an Irish Protestant – but I would stand by it and I would do so from an Anglican perspective, he said.

She said she would seek more information from Google regarding the security issue that may have exposed the data of at least 500,000 users to hundreds of external developers.

We have in train not only a national programme for 2019 to address this and other issues honestly and without sentimentality but a diocesan programme for 2020 in two parts: one looks to the present and its past inheritance; the other looks to the present and its future inheritance, he said.

Google said on Monday it would shut down the consumer version of Google+ and tighten its data-sharing policies after a bug potentially exposed user data that included name, email address, occupation, gender and age. The issue was discovered and patched in March as part of a review of how Google shares data with other applications. No developer exploited the vulnerability or misused data, the companys review found.

The Data Protection Commission was not aware of this issue and we now need to better understand the details of the breach, including the nature, impact and risk to individuals and we will be seeking information on these issues from Google, the regulator said. The commissioner is the relevant data protection authority for Google in Europe.

The conundrum raised by Victor Griffin, Dean of St Patricks of courageous and blessed memory, is something we in the Church of Ireland have never quite resolved and have rarely been able to address in an all-church way: the conundrum of being Anglican and Irish.

The Wall Street Journal reported that Google opted not to disclose the security issue due to fears of regulatory scrutiny, citing unnamed sources and a memo prepared by Googles legal and policy staff for senior executives.

While many still mourn the loss of establishment status, many argue that were it not for disestablishment coming historically when it did, the Anglican tradition in Ireland might have found it significantly more difficult to survive than it has done so, he said.

Google feared disclosure would invite comparison to Facebooks leak of user information to data firm Cambridge Analytica, the Journal reported, adding that chief executive Sundar Pichai had been briefed on the issue. Google declined to comment beyond its blog post.

Google said on Monday none of the thresholds it requires to disclose a breach were met after reviewing the type of data involved, whether it could identify the users to inform, establish any evidence of misuse, and whether there were any actions a developer or user could take to protect themselves.

As we commemorate the Disestablishment of the Church of Ireland and as this commemoration falls at a time of political stalemate and atrophy in so many spheres, it is important that we address the issue of our identity as Irish Anglicans.

Users have the right to be notified if their information could have been compromised, said Jacob Lehmann, managing director at legal firm Friedman CyZen. This is a direct result of the scrutiny that Facebook dealt with regarding the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

After the England teams victory over Sweden in the World Cup, a small group of England fans heard my accent in the supermarket and asked if Id been supporting England that day. The group were young, giddy and boozed up, and it was clear that the wrong answer could provoke an ugly response. Channelling my inner Michael D., I told them Id watched the game, and that England had played very well. Unfortunately, they picked up on my lack of enthusiasm and the tone of their questioning quickly turned.

Google+ launched in 2011 as the advertising giant grew more concerned about competition from Facebook, which could pinpoint ads to users based on data they had shared about their friends, likes and online activity.

Its all the British Isles mate. Whats your problem? one of them said seriously, and I was reminded of the Irish governments increasingly frustrating task of explaining to the Brexit negotiators that they have a border with Ireland to consider. Well, you live here now. So you should be supporting England, said another, effectively policing my nationalism and echoing the Love it or leave it sentiment often espoused by nationalists in the US.

Google+ copied Facebook with status updates and news feeds and let people organise their groups of friends into what it calls circles.

But Google+ and the companys other experiments with social media struggled to win over users because of complicated features and privacy mishaps.

The economic crises in both the UK and Ireland were caused by the same thing – financial malpractice by people who should have known better. But while in Ireland the man on the street blamed the Bankers, in the UK, mass immigration has been the punching bag of choice. The great paradox is that by tackling the imagined cause of the initial hardship, Brexit will likely trigger a brand-new economic calamity.

Facebook introduced a feature that allowed users to connect their accounts with their profiles on dating, music and other apps.

Google followed suit, letting outside developers access some Google+ data with users permission. The bug disclosed on Monday, introduced in a software update, exposed private data including name, email address, occupation, gender and age, Google said. It could not definitely say how many users were affected because it said it keeps only two weeks of such records.

Google+ will remain an internal networking option for organisations that buy Googles G Suite, a bundle of apps for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

I left university in 2011, part of the generation that had entered third level education at the height of the Celtic Tiger, only to graduate into economic purgatory. It was disorientating. A few friends and I soon found ourselves living in London. There was still plenty of work in the city, which made it easy to forget Britain was struggling too.

Googles plan to withdraw the free version of Google+, scheduled for August, could help strengthen its case to US policymakers and regulators that it is different from Facebook, which has faced political heat over allegations that data belonging to 87 million of its users was improperly shared with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica.

Google said on Monday it would shut down the consumer version of Google+ and tighten its data-sharing policies after a bug potentially exposed user data that included name, email address, occupation, gender and age. The issue was discovered and patched in March as part of a review of how Google shares data with other applications. No developer exploited the vulnerability or misused data, the companys review found.

Google refused to send Mr Pichai to a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on September 5th, where Facebooks chief operating officer and Twitters chief executive testified. An empty chair was left for Google after the committee rejected Googles top lawyer as a witness.

Several policies Google introduced on Monday are designed to curb the data accessible to developers offering mobile apps on the Google Play store or add-on apps for sending and organising Gmail messages.

Play Store apps will no longer be allowed to access text message and call logs unless they are the default calling or texting app on a users device or have an exception from Google.

Gmail add-ons available to consumers starting next year will be barred from selling user data and be subject to a third-party security assessment that will cost them about $15,000 to $75,000, Google said.

Such moves could strengthen Google by making it harder for competing services to grow off its data, said Chris Messina, a designer who worked on Google+ before leaving in 2013. In 2011, you wanted casual, scrappy developers creating apps, and now it is going to require a professional class that is serious. The walls are going up. – Reuters

Speaking at the Church of Ireland Synod in Greystones, Rev Dr Norman Gamble, a member of the Diocesan Board of Education, said our schools are part of our mission rather than for own people. Photograph: iStock

Google refused to send Mr Pichai to a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on September 5th, where Facebooks chief operating officer and Twitters chief executive testified. An empty chair was left for Google after the committee rejected Googles top lawyer as a witness.

Disharmony among parents and teachers at the Church of Ireland St Patricks primary school in Greystones, Co Wicklow was described last night as regrettable at the Dublin and Glendalough diocesan synod.

The left wants to run Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) out of the Senate. She had been a liberal hero for some time because of her "no" vote on Obamacare repeal last year. But, her decision to vote "yes" on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's candidacy for the Supreme Court means it will be hard for her to gain the left's trust again.

Karen Crean, who had been a board member at the school for 12 years, said it had taken a retrograde step. She pointed out that the school had been funded by taxpayers money and had a duty to provide an education also for our fellow brothers of other beliefs.

A heated debate over school admissions has been taking place at the school since July last when principal Eileen Jackson, in Greystones for more than 20 years, announced her resignation on the basis that the school was taking a new direction by making admission to State-funded education a collateral benefit of parochial engagement.

Protesters outside the Supreme Court Saturday said their "heart sunk" when Sen. Collins announced she was voting "yes" on Judge Kavanaugh. Others are suggesting they harass her in public. Sound familiar?

Also speaking at the synod, which took place in Greystones, Rev Dr Norman Gamble, a member of the Diocesan Board of Education, pointed out that our schools are part of our mission rather than for our own people. They were not tied down for denominational purposes. There were two views of church-run schools, he said we want our schools for Christian instruction, and for Christian education.

Christian instruction was what happened in Catholic schools in preparation for Holy Communion and Confirmation, he said, while Christian education gave an education about the Christian faith regardless of the background they (pupils) came from.

He continued: let us not allow our schools wither on the vine because we dont have parishioners.

"Maine and America deserve better," Rice, a former national security adviser for President Obama, explained.

Scott Golden from Greystones recalled how he had been educated in a single teacher Church of Ireland school in the north west.

Without children of other denominations that school could not have remained functioning, he said. Let us not be exclusionary or afraid of welcoming other denominations to our schools.

Rev Fred Appelbe, rector at Rathmichael, Co Wicklow, said the toughest task of my life has been school management. He advised people to be an curamach as to who they allowed into their schools. He has seen how, once admitted, such people can make all sorts of other demands.

Seamus Puirseill from Raheny suggested that possibly another rector could be appointed chair of the school board of management as the pastoral and human resources functions were quite separate.