Over 2 dozen whooping cough cases confirmed in communities north of Saskatoon

Over 2 dozen whooping cough cases confirmed in communities north of Saskatoon
Sask. doctor bothered by whooping cough cases; advises all to get vaccine
A doctor said hes bothered by whooping cough spreading in Saskatchewan, since theres a free vaccine to prevent it.

Any new case — it bothers me, said Dr. Simon Kapaj, a deputy medical health officer for the Saskatchewan Health Authority.

It is vaccine-preventable infection. Which means, we have the vaccine, the vaccine is free, and we are able to provide that shot. So from that, I think we shouldnt see whooping cough cases at all.

In about seven weeks, there have been 25 reported cases of whooping cough in the Rosthern area, according to the health authority. Nearly all of those cases involve children.

Kapaj said he worries about the infection spreading south to Saskatoon with holiday travel around the corner.

Dr. Simon Kapaj, a deputy medical health officer for the Saskatchewan Health Authority, speaks to reporters Nov. 14, 2018.

An inmate who escaped from the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge, a multi-level security federal facility near Maple Creek, has been found.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority has confirmed a spate of whooping cough cases in communities north of Saskatoon.

Video: How to protect yourself from whooping cough

Twenty-five cases have been confirmed in the Rosthern, Hague, Wakaw, Hepburn, and Waldheim areas since the start of October.

Most of the 25 cases were among children and teens, with half of the confirmed cases being children under the age of five.

Whooping cough, or pertussis, is a highly contagious infection of the lungs and throat. The disease can be fatal and is most serious in babies under the age of one.

“Any new case, it bothers me. It’s not only for that individual that caught the infection, but for the fact it is a vaccine preventable infection, which means we have the vaccine, the vaccine is free and we are able to provide that shot, said Dr. Simon Kapaj, the deputy medical health officer with the health authority.

In Saskatchewan, pertussis immunization is routinely offered at two, four, six and 18 months, and two boosters at four to six-years and in Grade 8.

Kapaj said its also important for adults, especially caregivers, to review their immunizations records.