Americans in Vancouver plan downtown protest on Thursday evening

Americans in Vancouver plan downtown protest on Thursday evening
Trumps new attorney general advised company that scammed investors out of thousands: reports
Before that, he served as chief of staff to now-former attorney general Jeff Sessions. Whitaker is replacing Sessions after he resigned at U.S. President Donald Trump‘s request on Wednesday.

But well before that, starting in 2014, Whitaker served as a paid adviser to World Patent Marketing, a Miami-based company that was ordered to pay an approximately US$26-million settlement earlier this year, the Guardian reported.

Trump had repeatedly criticized Sessions for recusing himself from any investigation into potential Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. That investigation is currently being lead by former FBI director Robert Mueller, who was appointed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and has overseen the probe's work.

World Patent Marketing was last year sued by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over allegations that it had scammed inventors by offering to promote their works in exchange for thousands of dollars, reported the Wall Street Journal.

Chief of Staff to the Attorney General Matthew Whitaker (L) looks over at U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions during a roundtable discussion with foreign liaison officers at the Justice Department in Washington, U.S., August 29, 2018.

On Wednesday, Jeff Sessions resigned as the country's chief law enforcement officer. U.S. President Donald Trump announced by tweet that 49-year-old Matthew Whitaker, Sessions's former chief of staff, would take over as acting attorney general until a permanent replacement is found at a later date.

Video: After Sessions firing, Sen. Manchin says country on “verge” of constitutional crisis

It described a company that would make contact with inventors, offering to help develop their products and monetize them.

However, its board, on which Whitaker sat alongside a time-travel scientist and world karate champion, didn’t meet or review any inventors’ pitches.

As the New Times told it, people ended up on the board through a “quid pro quo” arrangement that would see them paid as much as $12,500 every year.

Gonzales said if a decision is made to curtail or end the Mueller probe, that shouldn't be made by the acting attorney general, but someone within the normal lines of the chain of authority, either the deputy attorney general or the solicitor general.

Whitaker, who was paid almost $10,000 through regular payments of $1,875, received a donation of $2,600 from World Patent Marketing CEO Scott Cooper when he ran for the Senate in 2014.

When asked whether Whitaker would now assume control over the Mueller investigation, U.S. Justice Department spokesperson Sarah Flores said Whitaker would be "in charge of all matters" under the purview of the department.

He also appeared in marketing materials for the company, appearing in a video that showed him evaluating an invention, and saying in a news release, “World Patent Marketing goes beyond making statements about doing business ‘ethically’ and translate[s] those words into action.”

Video: Demonstrators March Through Philadelphia In Support Of Mueller Investigation

Fears for Russia probe as US President Donald Trump fires Attorney General Jeff Sessions?

While serving in this role, Whitaker sent an ex-client a threatening email after this person complained that he had not received the services that World Patent Marketing said it would provide.

Jeff Sessions resignation as attorney general on Wednesday sparked worries for the future of Muellers probe. Sessions vexed Trump by recusing himself from Muellers investigation in 2017, an act that Trump has berated him for throughout his presidency.

Video: Jeff Sessions Gone From DOJ: Whats Next?

In the email, which appeared in court records, Whitaker said that there could be “serious civil and criminal consequences” if the former client made a complaint with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) or “smear[ed]” the firm online.

Whitaker wasn’t named in the FTC’s lawsuit against World Patent Marketing, in which it was ordered to pay $25,987,192.

Cooper, the company’s CEO, later came to an arrangement in which he would pay $1 million in assets, as well as any money he made from the sale of his $3.5-million home.

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik 5/ Some of the demonstrations organizers said that acting Attorney General Matthew Whitakers appointment was a “deliberate attempt to obstruct the special counsels investigation.”

Global News has reached out to the U.S. Justice Department for comment. The Guardian could not reach Whitaker for a response.

In the middle of an already chaotic day, President Donald Trump forced Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign — and several hours later, late-night comedians were ready to weigh in. Even they couldn’t believe the swiftness of the news cycle.

“We’re like, forget the Democrats in the House. Clearly, the big news of the day is now going to be Trump and his fiery press conference,” Trevor Noah said on “The Daily Show.” “But then Trump stood up again and said, ‘Oh, you think I’m the story of the day? No, I’m the story of the day.’”

They all zeroed in on Trump’s anger toward Sessions, particularly about the fact that he recused himself from the Russia investigation.

“At the time when we formally take control of the House … well have to see what Bob Mueller has been able to do and what Bob Mueller has been able to say either via indictment or via report, and that will also guide what we intend to do in our committee,” Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking member on the House Intelligence Committee, told MSNBC on Tuesday.

“Trump has made no secret of his feelings about Sessions,” Colbert said. “He’s called Sessions a ‘traitor,’ ‘a dumb Southerner,’ ‘Mr. Magoo,’ and perhaps most humiliating of all, ‘member of my administration.’”

But in a letter outlining the scope of Muellers appointment last year, Rosenstein gave Mueller broad authority to not only investigate “any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated” with Trumps campaign, but examine “any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation.”

Here are some of the other topics that Noah, Colbert, Jimmy Kimmel, Seth Meyers, James Corden and Jimmy Fallon all covered:

Late-Night Hosts Have Field Day With Jeff Sessions Departure

Colbert: “Now, there is some confusion among stupid people as to whether Sessions was fired or he resigned. He did submit a letter of resignation, but it began, ‘At your request, I am submitting my resignation.’ Look at that. Southern hospitality until the end.”

Kimmel: “In the letter, he said he operated with integrity and strove to uphold the rule of law. And Trump was like, ‘Yeah, why do you think I fired you?’”

Meyers: “OK, but if it’s at his request, then it’s not a resignation. That’s like saying that you’re breaking up with someone because you don’t like the way they threw you out of the house.”

Mueller is writing his final report and sent Trump questions about Roger Stone

Noah: “Apparently, Trump didn’t fire him to his face or even call him. He just sent John Kelly with a prewritten resignation letter. John Kelly probably got there and he was like, ‘Alright Jeff, do you want to do it the easy way or the Omarosa way? Which one is it?’”

He will be replaced by acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker, who was Sessions chief of staff at the DOJ. Whitaker is widely seen as a Trump loyalist and was once reportedly described by chief of staff John Kelly as the West Wings “eyes and ears” in the DOJ.

Kimmel: “Trump didn’t even fire him, he had his chief of staff, John Kelly, do it. You know, the one and only thing Trump is good at is firing people, and he can’t even do that.”

Colbert: “Who on earth would be willing to go down in history as the man who stepped in to fire Robert Mueller? Enter new acting attorney general and Caucasian M&M, Matt Whitaker. Now, there is no way to know Whitaker’s stance on the Mueller investigation — unless you read his op-ed, ‘Mueller’s investigation of Trump is going too far.’”

Noah: “Just because Matt Whitaker came up with a hypothetical plan to fire Robert Mueller doesn’t mean that he actually thinks the Mueller investigation has gone too far — except there is the fact that he also wrote an op-ed that was literally called, ‘Mueller’s investigation of Trump has gone too far.’ Which to me is kind of a red flag.”

Billed as an “emergency protest,” event organizers Democrats Abroad and Moveon.org described it as a demonstration against U.S. President Donald Trump’s “sabotage of the Mueller investigation.”

Trump promises peace, but turmoil over Russia probe and media intensifies

Colbert: “So Trump just handpicked a guy who wants to stop the investigation into Donald Trump to be in charge of the investigation of Donald Trump. That’s like a defendant at a murder trial saying, ‘Your Honour, you’re fired. I’m going to have my friend Terry here take your seat. Now, then, Terry, if it please the court, did you throw that knife into the river like I asked? The correct answer is no.’”

On Wednesday, Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions, raising the possibility that Sessions’ replacement — Matthew Whitaker — could seek to curtail Mueller’s investigation.

Kimmel: “This guy wrote an op-ed critical of the Mueller investigation. That man will now be overseeing the Mueller investigation. OK, Bob Mueller, time to snort some Adderall and get that report done ASAP, you understand?”

Trumps acting attorney general: Judges should be Christian with a “biblical view of justice”

Noah: “The Mueller investigation is in danger. And somebody tells that me right now Robert Mueller is in a bathroom stall trying finish his homework before they shut it all down.”

Noah: “(Trump) didn’t fire Jeff Sessions. He just said ‘Rumpelstiltskin’ and then the curse was broken.”

Acting AG Matthew Whitaker Could Absolutely Foil Robert Muellers Backup Plans

Kimmel: “That’s him exiting the building, leaving the Department of Justice to go back to live in his hollow tree.”

Donald Trump is not responsible for every bad thing that happens in America. The press was already distrusted by many Americans before his vitriolic campaign—though it certainly stoked their enmity—with citizens increasingly siloed into their own closed communities, both online and off. And maybe Robert Mueller, reportedly writing up his final report on the presidents alleged obstruction of justice and collusion, will be allowed to see his work through; whether that report sees the light of day is another matter. But the last day or so has shown how chaotic politics under Trump will remain until at least 2021. Americans, in spite of a buzzing economy, were not high on the national outlook when they went to the ballot box for the midterms, exit polls showed. Whats happened since suggests their long national nightmare is nowhere near over. Gun reform is a nonstarter, white nationalists are not about to be reined in by this Congress, the media is still a target, and the president has loyalists atop the legal system, from the Department of Justice to the Supreme Court.

Protect Mueller protests are erupting across the country

Fallon: “It makes sense that he’s leaving now. Santa needs him to start making toys at the North Pole.”

After Democrats (mostly) cleaned up on Tuesday, no one actually expected Donald Trump to act like a president who had just been rejected and cost dozens of his partys incumbents their jobs. But in addition to blustering on Twitter about his partys great success—Republicans did win seats in the Senate—Trump forced out Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a man once derided by Democrats as an unreformed possibly neo-Confederate stooge but who had emerged as a sort of check on Trumps worst impulses. Most importantly, even as he sent the criminal justice system into retrograde, Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation—he had been a key part of Trumps campaign and had misled Congress about meetings with Russians, so this was a responsible move. The recusal effectively protected Robert Muellers probe, because Sessionss second in command, Rod Rosenstein, was a mainstream career prosecutor who consistently expressed confidence in Muellers integrity.

Corden: “I’ll tell you one thing: Jeff Sessions is leaving some very, very tiny shoes to fill.”

Also Wednesday, the president delivered an unusually aggressive rejoinder during his press conference, lashing out at CNNs Jim Acosta for asking him about the racist migrant caravan ads that amounted to the GOPs closing argument with voters. Pundits are still debating whether those ads “worked” or not—that seems impossible to discern—but the president rehashing his “enemies of the people” rhetoric about the media was jarring. We knew Trump wasnt going to admit hed become extremely unpopular—his ego does not allow that. And Trump has routinely sparred with the press, and Acosta in particular. But for the president to behave the way he did, and for his press secretary to subsequently tweet a doctored video of the back and forth between Trump and Acosta and falsely suggest the reporter groped a press intern, clarified that the reality-based community still does not include the people living in the White House.

Meyers: “That’s right, Attorney General Jeff Sessions stepped down today. Apparently he’s been on a stool this whole time.”

The president also doubled-down on hate Wednesday, calling a black reporters question about white nationalism “racist.” Within hours of that surreal encounter, a prominent white nationalist—whose far-right groups slogan “You will not replace us” became the slightly more infamous “Jews will not erase us” chant at Charlottesville last summer—tweeted a photo of himself appearing at the White House. The picture apparently stemmed from a visit last month, but regardless of when picture was taken, it served as a reminder that white nationalists of all stripes have been emboldened under this president, and some have enjoyed disturbing access to the highest corridors of power. A couple dozen House seats changing hands—and Democrats having new investigatory powers—is unlikely to make such people feel less safe in expressing themselves, violently or otherwise.

Noah: “People were talking about Sessions getting fired for so long, he probably already had a backup job lined up. He’s like, ‘It’s OK, I’m already assistant manager at Baby Gap. But I want you to know I’ve recused myself from folding those onesies.’ “

We still dont know how or whether Whitaker will interfere with Mueller, but initial reports suggested he had assumed supervisory authority over the probe, replacing Rosenstein in that role. And while House Democrats have made noise about using their bully pulpit to give Mueller a platform if he were fired—and can fire off their own subpoenas—the Justice Department under Whitaker remains the only real mechanism for compelling presidential cooperation with outside probes. Theres a chance Whitakers appointment gets challenged in court, as it was ostensibly carried out under a somewhat contested law concerning federal appointments. And Trump may well formally nominate someone else to take on the gig full time. But so long as Whitakers in that role, and it could be for months, the ability of anyone to rein Trump is in worse shape than it was on Tuesday.

Colbert: “No word what Jeff Sessions is going to do next. I assume he’s going to spend more time with his family separation policy.”

But when Trump on Wednesday replaced Sessions with the AGs spokesman, a former Iowa US Attorney named Matthew Whitaker, he took one of his most shameless steps yet to handicap the investigation into his campaign. In addition to being a hardcore Trump acolyte, Whitaker has explicitly suggested in partisan op-eds and cable appearances that Mueller may be engaged in a “witch hunt” and overstepping his mandate in probing the presidents personal finances; he also appears to have personal conflicts of interest in the case. This is to say nothing of Whitaker having reportedly threatened someone victimized by a company the feds labeled a scam as recently as 2015. Thats a lawman in Trumps own image, if ever there was one.

In the middle of an already chaotic day, President Donald Trump forced Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign — and several hours later, late-night comedians were ready to weigh in. Even they couldn’t believe the swiftness of the news cycle.

Jeff Sessions protests: thousands march after Trump fires attorney general – as it happened

“We’re like, forget the Democrats in the House. Clearly, the big news of the day is now going to be Trump and his fiery press conference,” Trevor Noah said on “The Daily Show.” “But then Trump stood up again and said, ‘Oh, you think I’m the story of the day? No, I’m the story of the day.’”

The axing capped more than a year of bitter criticism by the president over his legal advisors decision to recuse himself from the probe into Moscows interference in the 2016 election, paving the way for the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller. In announcing the resignation in a tweet that thanked the former Alabama senator “for his service” — Trump right away named as acting attorney general Sessions chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker.

Acting AG could imperil Mueller probe

They all zeroed in on Trump’s anger toward Sessions, particularly about the fact that he recused himself from the Russia investigation.

But the president was infuriated when in March 2017 Sessions recused himself from the nascent Russia investigation, because of his own Russian contacts during the 2016 campaign. Instead, he gave Rosenstein that authority. When Trump weeks later fired FBI director James Comey in anger at the Russia investigation, Rosenstein stunned the administration by naming Mueller, a former FBI chief, to lead the probe as an independent prosecutor.

“Trump has made no secret of his feelings about Sessions,” Colbert said. “He’s called Sessions a ‘traitor,’ ‘a dumb Southerner,’ ‘Mr. Magoo,’ and perhaps most humiliating of all, ‘member of my administration.’”

Moreover, Muellers team and the White House have been haggling for months over whether the president himself would answer questions. Mueller is known to be examining whether Trump obstructed justice in firing Comey – and other acts. In addition, the White House has shown concern that Mueller is investigating the finances of the Trump Organization, and links to Russia.

Here are some of the other topics that Noah, Colbert, Jimmy Kimmel, Seth Meyers, James Corden and Jimmy Fallon all covered:

They were joined in their demands by Republican Mitt Romney, a former presidential candidate and frequent Trump critic who won a US Senate seat in Tuesdays midterm. Thanking Sessions for his service, Romney said that it was “imperative that the important work of the Justice Department continues, and that the Mueller investigation proceeds to its conclusion unimpeded.”

Election? What election?

Colbert: “Now, there is some confusion among stupid people as to whether Sessions was fired or he resigned. He did submit a letter of resignation, but it began, ‘At your request, I am submitting my resignation.’ Look at that. Southern hospitality until the end.”

Kimmel: “In the letter, he said he operated with integrity and strove to uphold the rule of law. And Trump was like, ‘Yeah, why do you think I fired you?’”

In an op-ed in August last year he publicly urged Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein – who oversees the probe – to “limit the scope of his investigation to the four corners of the order appointing him special counsel.” As acting attorney general, Whitaker now has the power to wrest oversight away from Rosenstein and take charge himself.

Meyers: “OK, but if it’s at his request, then it’s not a resignation. That’s like saying that you’re breaking up with someone because you don’t like the way they threw you out of the house.”

The announcement set off immediate alarm bells: Whitaker has been overtly critical of the broad scope granted to Muellers team to probe beyond allegations that Trumps campaign colluded with Russia in 2016, into other ties between Trump, his family and aides, and Russia – an investigation the president calls a “witch hunt.”

Noah: “Apparently, Trump didn’t fire him to his face or even call him. He just sent John Kelly with a prewritten resignation letter. John Kelly probably got there and he was like, ‘Alright Jeff, do you want to do it the easy way or the Omarosa way? Which one is it?’”

Three senior Republicans warn Trump not to close Mueller probe – but most remain silent over Jeff Sessions firing

Kimmel: “Trump didn’t even fire him, he had his chief of staff, John Kelly, do it. You know, the one and only thing Trump is good at is firing people, and he can’t even do that.”

Colbert: “Who on earth would be willing to go down in history as the man who stepped in to fire Robert Mueller? Enter new acting attorney general and Caucasian M&M, Matt Whitaker. Now, there is no way to know Whitaker’s stance on the Mueller investigation — unless you read his op-ed, ‘Mueller’s investigation of Trump is going too far.’”

Noah: “Just because Matt Whitaker came up with a hypothetical plan to fire Robert Mueller doesn’t mean that he actually thinks the Mueller investigation has gone too far — except there is the fact that he also wrote an op-ed that was literally called, ‘Mueller’s investigation of Trump has gone too far.’ Which to me is kind of a red flag.”

Colbert: “So Trump just handpicked a guy who wants to stop the investigation into Donald Trump to be in charge of the investigation of Donald Trump. That’s like a defendant at a murder trial saying, ‘Your Honour, you’re fired. I’m going to have my friend Terry here take your seat. Now, then, Terry, if it please the court, did you throw that knife into the river like I asked? The correct answer is no.’”

Trump forces out AG Jeff Sessions in midterm election fallout

Kimmel: “This guy wrote an op-ed critical of the Mueller investigation. That man will now be overseeing the Mueller investigation. OK, Bob Mueller, time to snort some Adderall and get that report done ASAP, you understand?”

Trump forces out Jeff Sessions in midterm election fallout

Noah: “The Mueller investigation is in danger. And somebody tells that me right now Robert Mueller is in a bathroom stall trying finish his homework before they shut it all down.”

Noah: “(Trump) didn’t fire Jeff Sessions. He just said ‘Rumpelstiltskin’ and then the curse was broken.”

Kimmel: “That’s him exiting the building, leaving the Department of Justice to go back to live in his hollow tree.”

Fallon: “It makes sense that he’s leaving now. Santa needs him to start making toys at the North Pole.”

Corden: “I’ll tell you one thing: Jeff Sessions is leaving some very, very tiny shoes to fill.”

Meyers: “That’s right, Attorney General Jeff Sessions stepped down today. Apparently he’s been on a stool this whole time.”

Noah: “People were talking about Sessions getting fired for so long, he probably already had a backup job lined up. He’s like, ‘It’s OK, I’m already assistant manager at Baby Gap. But I want you to know I’ve recused myself from folding those onesies.’ “

Colbert: “No word what Jeff Sessions is going to do next. I assume he’s going to spend more time with his family separation policy.”