Rosa weakens to tropical storm on way to Baja, Southwest US

Rosa weakens to tropical storm on way to Baja, Southwest US
Hurricane Rosa threatening Southwest U.S. with flash flooding
Hurricane Rosa is shown from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric (NOAA) GOES East satellite over the eastern Pacific Ocean on September 27, 2018, in this image provided September 28, 2018. Image taken September 27, 2018. NOAA/Handout via REUTERS

Hurricane Rosa was on a track Sunday to drench northwest Mexico and parts of the U.S. Southwest, prompting tropical storm warnings for the Baja California coast and flash-flood watches for parts of four U.S. states.

“Leslie is expected to move over cooler waters, partly induced by its own upwelling, as it heads northeastward back over its previous track,” according to a discussion of the storm from the NHC. “The bottom line is that Leslie is forecast to meander over the central Atlantic through the forecast period,” it added.

Hurricane Rosa barrelling toward Mexico, southwestern U.S.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Rosa should still be at tropical storm force when it hits the Baja California Peninsula and Sonora state Monday with flooding rains. It’s then expected to move quickly northwestward as it weakens, bringing five to 10 of rain to the Mogollon Rim of Arizona and around five cm to the rest of the desert Southwest, Central Rockies and Great Basin. Some isolated areas might be more.

Rosa still had maximum sustained winds of 140 kph early Sunday and it was centred about 570 kilometres southwest of Punta Eugenia in Mexico. It was heading north at 19 kph.

Video: Arizona to see remnants of Hurricane Rosa early next week

First measurable rain since May to follow Rosa into California

The National Weather Service announced flash flood watches through Tuesday for areas including southern Nevada, southeastern California, southwestern and central Utah and the western two-thirds of Arizona.

Rosa should essentially maintain its current forward speed until landfall occurs in 36-48 hours due to the cyclone not being influenced by the faster deep-layer steering flow, according to the NHCs forecast discussion of the storm.

Forecasts call for heavy rainfall in the watch areas, which include Las Vegas, Phoenix and Salt Lake City, with possible flooding in slot canyons and normally dry washes and a potential for debris flows from recent wildfire burn scars.

The National Weather Service has announced flash flood watches for the Southwest United States and a tropical storm warning for northwest Mexico as Hurricane Rosa churns closer. According to the National Hurricane Center, Rosa is weakening but is still expected to be a tropical storm when it hits the Baja California Peninsula and Mexicos Sonora state on Monday. As of Sunday afternoon, Rosa had maximum sustained winds of 120 kilometers per hour as it headed north at about 20 kph. Weather forecasters predict heavy rains and thunderstorms for the watch areas, which include the U.S. cities of Las Vegas, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Outer bands of the storm are also expected to bring much-needed rain to coastal Southern California. Meanwhile, Hurricane Sergio continues to gain strength in the Atlantic but currently poses no threat to land.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Sergio was growing in the Pacific and could grow to near major-hurricane force within days, though it posed no immediate threat to land.

Sergio had winds of 85 kph early Sunday and it was centred about 780 kilometres south of Manzanillo, Mexico. The storm was moving west at 19 kph.

This infrared satellite image shows hurricane Rosa nearing the coast of Mexico at 8:15 Eastern Time on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018. (NOAA)

Once a strong Category 4 storm, Rosa continues to weaken as it moves to the north-northeast, making a projected landfall in the Mexican state of Baja California on Monday afternoon.

MEXICO CITY — Hurricane Rosa weakened into a tropical storm Sunday as it headed toward northwest Mexico and parts of the U.S. Southwest, prompting storm warnings for the Baja California coast and flash-flood watches for parts of four U.S. states.

Hurricane Rosa targets Southwest, heavy rainfall expected

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Rosa should hit the Baja California Peninsula and Sonora state late Monday as a tropical storm with flooding rains.

Rosa is on track to hit the Baja California Peninsula Monday with flooding rains. Arizona will be showered with the storms remnants starting late Monday and lasting through Wednesday in some parts of the state. Moisture from Hurricane Rosa will lead to the possibility of record rainfall and flash flooding next week.

Its then expected to move quickly northwestward as it weakens, bringing 2 to 4 inches (5-10 centimetres) of rain to the Mogollon Rim of Arizona and 1 to 2 inches (2.5-5 centimetres) to the rest of the desert Southwest, Central Rockies and Great Basin. Some isolated areas might be more.

It looks like we will start to see our first bits of moisture from Rosa Sunday afternoon. The National Weather Service in Phoenix issued a small stream flood advisory around 12:40 p.m. Sunday and a severe thunderstorm warning for Yuma shortly after.

Rosa had maximum sustained winds of 70 mph (110 kph) Sunday evening and was centred about 235 miles (380 kilometres) southwest of Punta Eugenia in Mexico. It was heading north-northeast at 12 mph (19 kph).

The National Weather Service announced flash flood watches through Wednesday for areas including southern Nevada, southeastern California, southwestern and central Utah and the western two-thirds of Arizona.

606PM: Who in #Phoenix is ready for some rain? Showers and thunderstorms starting to move northward into the Valley. Watch for localized street flooding and isolated thunderstorms. #azwx pic.twitter.com/IIZCnL3PYO

Forecasts call for heavy rainfall in the watch areas, which include Las Vegas, Phoenix and Salt Lake City, with possible flooding in slot canyons and normally dry washes and a potential for landslides and debris flows from recent wildfire burn scars.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Sergio was growing in the Pacific and could become a hurricane force late Sunday night or early Monday, though it posed no immediate threat to land.

Sergio had winds of 65 mph (100 kph) Sunday afternoon and was centred about 535 miles (860 kilometres) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. The storm was moving west at 13 mph (20 kph).

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