We are at the mercy of men: Reports of rape and sexual abuse in North Korea

\We are at the mercy of men\: Reports of rape and sexual abuse in North Korea
North Korea Readies Nuclear Sites For International Inspectors: Report
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South Koreas spy agency has observed preparations by North Korea for international inspections at several of its nuclear and missile test sites, the Yonhap news agency said on Wednesday, citing a South Korean lawmaker.

The Japanese government has dismissed the ruling as unbelievable and insists that all claims against Japan for its occupation of the Korean Peninsula between 1910 and 1945 were settled under the 1965 agreement that normalised diplomatic relations and provided $300 million in compensation.

North Korean women face widespread sexual violence by government officials, rights group says

U.S. officials declined to confirm the observations, but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in Washington he planned to meet his North Korean negotiating counterpart next week and would speak to him about inspections.

On Tuesday, Mr Moon said he hoped to build forward-looking ties with Japan after the South Korean Supreme Court ruled that a Japanese steelmaker should provide £69,100 in compensation to each of four Koreans forced to work at the companys factories during World War II. 

Pompeo said in a radio interview that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had committed to allowing U.S. inspectors at two “significant” sites when he met him in Pyongyang this month.

The petition, which had gathered more than 26,000 signatures in its first three days, is calling for the group to be barred because Sakura Miyawaki sang the national anthem at an event for the Japanese Self-Defence Forces and other right wing-related concerts. 

“We hope to get them there before too long,” he told the Laura Ingraham show. Pompeo did not identify the sites.

The South Korean courts challenge to the assertion that the issue of compensation has been settled means it is likely that dozens of additional claims will now be filed against Japanese companies that used Korean labourers.  

Kim Min-ki of South Koreas ruling Democratic Party told reporters earlier that the countrys National Intelligence Service observed North Koreans “conducting preparation and intelligence activities that seem to be in preparation for foreign inspectors visit” at Punggye-ri nuclear test site and the Sohae Satellite launching ground.

A petition on the website of the Blue House, the official residence of Moon Jae-in, the South Korean president, is demanding that the Japanese right-wing singers be banned from appearing on television programmes.

The lawmaker added that no major movements had been seen at Yongbyon, the Norths main nuclear complex.

Any hopes that the spiralling diplomatic relationship between Seoul and Tokyo might be reversed through the lyrics of K-pop and that historical differences of opinion might be set aside have quickly been dashed.

North Korea has stopped nuclear and missile tests in the past year, but it did not allow international inspections of its dismantling of Punggye-ri in May, drawing criticism that the action was merely for show and could be reversed.

The South Korean-Japanese pop project IZ*ONE was formed out of the 12 finalists from a Korean music talent show and released its first eight-track album on Monday. 

In September, Kim Jong Un also pledged at a summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in to close Sohae and allow experts to observe the dismantling of the missile engine-testing site and a launch pad.

At the time, Moon said North Korea agreed to let international inspectors observe a “permanent dismantlement” of key missile facilities, and take further steps, such as closing Yongbyon, in return for reciprocal moves by the United States.

Washington has demanded steps such as a full disclosure of the Norths nuclear and missile facilities, before agreeing to Pyongyangs key goals.

American officials have been sceptical of Kims commitment to giving up nuclear weapons, but the Norths pledge at the summit with the South drew an enthusiastic response from President Donald Trump, who met Kim in an unprecedented summit in June and has been keen on a second meeting.

Pompeo told Laura Ingraham Washington hoped the second summit would take place early next year “where we can make a substantial breakthrough in taking down the nuclear threat from North Korea.”

“Theres a lot of work which remains, and Chairman Kim has made clear to me – just as plain as Im speaking to you, Laura – that he has the intention to denuclearize and well do everything we can to assist him in following through on that commitment.”

Pompeo did not name his counterpart, but Kim Yong Chol, a close aide to Kim Jong Un, has led past negotiating sessions with him.

The State Department declined to provide details, but the meeting is expected to take place in New York.

Also in Washington, South Korean Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo said the United States and South Korea would make a decision by December on major joint military exercises for 2019.

Earlier this month, the two countries suspended Vigilant Ace, one of several exercises that have been halted to encourage dialogue.

“We are not right now concerned with a loss of combat capability,” U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters after the meeting with his South Korean counterpart.

“Clearly as we go forward, well have to make adaptations to ensure we dont lose that capability. But right now, again this is not a total suspension of all collaboration and military exercises,” Mattis added.