Plane with landing gear issue makes emergency landing at Stephenville airport

Plane with landing gear issue makes emergency landing at Stephenville airport
UPDATE Plane Makes Emergency Landing at Stephenville Airport
A plane headed for Deer Lake in western Newfoundland made an emergency landing at Stephenville airport today because of an issue with its landing gear.

The Provincial Airlines Flight 1922 plane tried to land in Deer Lake when it encountered the problem, the airline said in a news release.

STEPHENVILLE, N.L. — An airline says a plane was forced to make what it described as an "emergency landing" today at an airport in western Newfoundland after encountering issues with its nose landing gear.

Given adverse weather conditions in Deer Lake, the pilot circled around before heading to Stephenville, where an emergency landing was necessary.

It says there was inclement weather in Deer Lake, so the Dash 8 aircraft proceeded to the Stephenville airport for landing, as the nose gear could not be confirmed as locked.

It was nothing like I was expecting. I was expecting more of a grind coming to a halt, but you didn't even feel it.- Passenger Gene BabbThere were 47 passengers and four crew aboard the Dash 8 aircraft, the airline said, and no injuries.

The PAL Airlines Flight 1922 crash-landed at Stephenville airport just after noon; social media photos showed the plane at rest on the runway, nose-down on the tarmac.

Gene Babb, who was on the flight, said the pilot and crew did a "phenomenal job" under the circumstances.

The airline says it was en route to Deer Lake, N.L., carrying 47 passengers and four crew when crew members learned of an issue with the nose landing gear.

"I survived a plane crash. It's something to say. It's not often or not many people who get to be involved in that," Babb told CBC News.

The airline says the crew followed procedure, including a flyby of the Deer Lake control tower for a visual check of the nose gear position.

"Not that you would want to, but no, I just look back and think it's cool. Great job. I was more impressed with the pilot and the crew. They were phenomenal, I gotta say."

Babb said the flight was originally scheduled to land in Deer Lake before carrying on to St. John's, but the pilot found the landing-gear issue.

PAL Airlines says the plane landed without the nose gear locked in position and came to a stop on the runway.

The pilot came on the announcement system to tell people to prepare for an emergency landing, and Babb said that's when people got nervous.

An airline says a plane was forced to make what it described as an emergency landing today at an airport in western Newfoundland after encountering issues with its nose landing gear.

"When they announced that we had to be in cross position for landing, to put your head down or your hands across the back of your chair, that's when people started getting a little bit worried and panicked," he said.

"You had kids crying. Some of the guys were nervous and stuff like that. That's when I guess it got real."

Babb himself has put some hours in flying an aircraft. His father was a pilot and his sister-in-law is a pilot for Air Canada, so he wasn't nervous.

The airline says it was en route to Deer Lake, N.L., carrying 47 passengers and four crew when crew members learned of an issue with the nose landing gear.

"I was trying to calm the passengers around me down, let them know everything will be OK," said Babb.

The airline says the crew followed procedure, including a flyby of the Deer Lake control tower for a visual check of the nose gear position.

"The landing was actually extremely smooth, and the plane came to a stop and had a bit of a jolt, and no more to it than that."

PAL Airlines says the plane landed without the nose gear locked in position and came to a stop on the runway.

Some people were crying when they got off the plane, but more out of relief than out of fear, he said.

"It was nothing like I was expecting. I was expecting more of a grind coming to a halt, but you didn't even feel it."

Dana Kelly-Martin, who was also on the flight, said everyone remained calm when the pilot announced the emergency landing.

But just as the plane was descending, she said, flight attendants started shouting at passengers to get down.

"That's when it hits, you don't know what's going to happen," she said. "It was kind of surreal."

She says she instinctively pulled out her phone to text her daughter and husband, telling them she loved them.

Kelly-Martin said passengers arrived at the airport to "a load of pizza," which they ate while waiting for coaches to take them to Deer Lake.

Brenda Martin, CEO of the Stephenville airport, said most of her staff just happened to be at work that day, planning for winter operations.

"I think things went fantastic, considering the event," she said. "Passengers seemed to be in good spirits."

Martin believes a malfunctioning indicator light for the front landing gear caused the pilot's concern. She said the Transport Safety Board is expected early tomorrow morning to investigate.

The runway will remain closed until Martin is given the all-clear to remove the plane, she said, meaning Stephenville can't be used as a safe alternate airport in the interim.

Given the windstorm, she said, "we do need that aircraft to come off the runway as soon as possible."

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The front landing gear of the PAL Airlines aircraft failed to lock, causing the plane to land with its nose touching the runway.

PAL Airlines says there were no injuries. The passengers were transported to the terminal in ground vehicles.

The incident has forced some changes to flight schedules, in addition to existing weather-related changes.