Typhoon causes Canada-Namibia to be cancelled at Rugby World Cup – TSN

Typhoon causes Canada-Namibia to be cancelled at Rugby World Cup - TSN
Typhoon Hagibis plows north after paralyzing Tokyo area, leaving 4 dead
3h ago Typhoon causes Canada-Namibia match to be cancelled at Rugby World Cup Rugby World Cup organizers have cancelled a third game because of Typhoon Hagibis, deciding early Sunday morning to call off the last of the Pool B games between Canada and Namibia. The Canadian Press

TOKYO — Canada will leave the Rugby World Cup winless for the second straight tournament, with the weather tying its hands this time.

World Rugby told fans of Namibia and Canada not to travel to Kamashi ahead of Sundays planned match, as they consider whether it should be cancelled. The teams have also been advised of potential cancellation.

Typhoon Hagibis: Two dead as most powerful storm for decades hits Japan

Tournament organizers decided to cancel Canadas final Pool B game against Namibia because of Typhoon Hagibis. The game was due to take place Sunday in Kamaishi (late Saturday night in Canada).

Japans rugby team had to wade through flood waters to get to their sodden pitch for practice, as their match against Scotland on Sunday could still go ahead if organisers believe it is safe.

World Rugby issued a statement saying an evacuation order remained in place in the Kamaishi area and there had been landslides and flooding in the vicinity of the stadium.

Englands match against France was cancelled, and the team has returned to Miyazaki where they held their pre-tournament training camp. New Zealands match against Italy was also cancelled.

“The safety of all involved in Rugby World Cup 2019 is our primary consideration and fans are advised not to travel to Kamaishi or the venue, which will be closed,” World Rugby said.

An earthquake measuring 5.3, according to the US Geological Survey, shook the areas which had been drenched by rainfall. The earthquake was in the ocean off Chiba, near Tokyo.

Namibia-Canada Rugby World Cup match cancelled due to typhoon

Two of Saturdays three scheduled games were cancelled well before the destructive typhoon made landfall and organizers will assess conditions in Yokohama before making a decision on Japans last Pool A game against Scotland later Sunday.

Yasushi Kajihara, from Japans meteorological agency, said: “Be ready for rainfall of the kind that you have never experienced. Take all measures necessary to save your life.”

Video: Super-typhoon Hagibis tears through Japan toward Tokyo | DW News

Two of Saturdays three scheduled games — New Zealand against Italy and England against France — were cancelled well before the destructive typhoon made landfall. Organizers will assess conditions in Yokohama before making a decision on Japans last Pool A game against Scotland later Sunday.

Organisers of the Japanese Formula One Grand Prix have cancelled all practice and qualifying sessions, while two matches of the Rugby World Cup have also been scratched.

Canada, ranked 22nd in the world, had targeted the game against No. 23 Namibia as its best chance at a victory.

Authorities issued evacuation advisories and orders for more than 6 million people across the country as the storm unleashed the heaviest rain and winds in years. Some 80 injuries have been reported so far, while more than 270,000 households lost power, NHK said.

Both teams had previously lost to No. 1 New Zealand, No. 5 South Africa and No. 12 Italy. While the teams were tied at two points apiece, Namibia finished fourth in the pool ahead of Canada on points difference (minus-141 for Namibia and minus-163 for Canada).

The most powerful typhoon to hit Tokyo in decades plowed into northern Japan early on Sunday after fierce rain and wind paralyzed the capital, led to four deaths, millions under evacuation warnings, rivers flooded and normally busy streets deserted.

“We completely understand the decision given the conditions were facing here,” Canadian media manager Gareth Rees said in a video showing the wind-whipped waves on Kamaishi.

“Damage from floods and landslides is likely taking place already,” an agency official told a news conference carried by NHK. “It is critical that people take action urgently to protect their lives and the lives of loved ones.”

Video: Tokyo braces for powerful Typhoon Hagibis

“Following extensive discussions with World Rugby, Kamaishi City and Iwate Prefecture, during which we considered every possibility to make this game happen, in the end we had no option but to cancel the match to ensure the safety of the fans, team, volunteers, and all others involved,” organizing committee chief executive Akira Shimazu said.

A 50-year-old man was killed near Tokyo early on Saturday in a car overturned by punishing winds, while another person died after being washed away in a car, public broadcaster NHK said. Nine people remain missing in landslides and flooding, it said.

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“It was both a difficult and emotional decision to make, however I feel its the right decision and firmly believe both domestic and foreign fans will understand the decision was made to ensure safety.”

Three people died in Chiba, Gunma and Kanagawa prefectures surrounding Tokyo, while a man in his 60s was found with no vital signs in a flooded apartment in Kawasaki, public broadcaster NHK said. Seventeen were missing early Sunday, it said.

The Canadian men, who went 0-4-0 at the 2015 tournament, have not won a game at the world Cup since a 25-20 victory over Tonga at the 2011 competition. They have lost their last eight tournament matches, outscored 387-87 in the process.

Video: Typhoon Hagibis lashes Tokyo and large parts of Japan

The Japan Meteorological Agency had forecast the typhoon to be the worst to hit Japan in six decades. It brought heavy rainfall in wide areas of Japan all day ahead of its landfall early Saturday evening, and continued to batter parts of the main island with heavy winds and torrents of rain overnight.

Moving the Japan-Scotland game to Monday might be an option, but it would be giving Japan and Scotland an unfair opportunity that was denied to England, France, New Zealand and Italy. I personally wanted to see England play France. If you move one game, then all three games should have been moved. My solution would have been to have the New Zealand-Italy and England-France games played yesterday since they were already at their stadium cities anyway. Then it would have been acceptable to move the Japan-Scotland game to Monday if necessary.

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 5.7 shook the areas drenched by the rainfall, shortly before the typhoon made landfall in Shizuoka prefecture.

PreviousNextHide captionToggle Fullscreen1 of 0 commentsThe most powerful typhoon to hit Tokyo in decades plowed into northern Japan early on Sunday after fierce rain and wind paralyzed the capital, leading to four deaths as rivers flooded and normally busy streets were deserted.

The match only seems to be being called off because of the logistics of organising a normal match for a stadium full of spectators. Who cares about them, just play it a different day to a closed stadium if you have to. People can still watch it on TV, theres no reason to call the whole thing off when both teams are ready to go and its perfect possible to play

Authorities lifted rain and flood warnings for the Kanto region around a becalmed Tokyo before dawn on Sunday, but imposed them on areas further north after Typhoon Hagibis blasted through the capital.

Move the game to monday and you wont have to worry about the safety of everyone as well as end up not creating a controversy that one team was sacrificed to benefit the host. Give the scots their day on the field let them decide their own fate and not some bogus decision using safety as a pretext.

Attention focused on Fukushima, where Tokyo Electric Power Co overnight reported irregular readings from sensors monitoring water in its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, which was crippled by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Its unknown if the water will recede if the river overflows and if it does they will be playing in a swamp not a field which neither side will call it a fair game if they lose. Even before the game starts I doubt the team or spectators will reach the stadium in the first place in those conditions.

Three people died in Chiba, Gunma and Kanagawa prefectures surrounding Tokyo, while a man in his 60s was found with no vital signs in a flooded apartment in Kawasaki, public broadcaster NHK said. Seventeen were missing early Sunday, it said.

Its only right to err on side of caution and cancel the Brave Blossoms v Scotland match. Proceeding with the game will put more pressure on emergency workers, police etc. after working through the night. Also, there is no guarantee transport will be a running effectively.

2019 Rugby World Cup: Japan complete captains run as Typhoon Hagibis strikes

Authorities issued evacuation advisories and orders for more than six million people across the country as the storm unleashed the heaviest rain and winds in years. Some 80 injuries have been reported so far, while more than 270,000 households lost power, NHK said.

Tornado hits in Japan as country braces itself for typhoon

The storm, which the government said could be the strongest to hit Tokyo since 1958, brought record-breaking rainfall in many areas, including the popular resort town of Hakone, which was hit with 94 centimetres of rain over 24 hours.

Hagibis, which means speed in the Philippine language Tagalog, was advancing north-northwestward with maximum sustained winds of 162 kilometres per hour, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency. It was expected to make landfall near Tokyo later Saturday and then pass out to sea eastward.

Hagibis, which means "speed" in the Philippine language Tagalog, made landfall on Japan's main island of Honshu on Saturday evening. A magnitude 5.7 earthquake shook Tokyo shortly after.

Even as the typhoon moved away from the capital late on Saturday, one expert warned of further flooding as several surrounding prefectures began releasing water from dams, letting it flow downstream.

Typhoon Hagibis, closing in from the Pacific, is expected to bring up to 80 centimetres of rain in the Tokyo area, including Chiba to the north that had suffered power outages from a typhoon that hit last month, and some buildings remained partly repaired.

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"The situation is now worse than this evening," Nobuyuki Tsuchiya, director of the Japan Riverfront Research Centre, told Reuters. About 1.5 million people in Tokyo live below sea level.

The storm has disrupted this nations three-day weekend, which includes Sports Day on Monday. Qualifying for a Formula One auto race in Suzuka was pushed to Sunday. The Defense Ministry cut a three-day annual navy review to a single day on Monday.

The Japan Meteorological Agency issued the highest alert level for 12 prefectures, warning of potential for once in decades rain totals. It lifted the alerts early Sunday.

"Damage from floods and landslides is likely taking place already," an agency official told a news conference carried by NHK. "It is critical that people take action urgently to protect their lives and the lives of loved ones."

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Just last month, another strong storm, Typhoon Faxai, destroyed or damaged 30,000 houses in Chiba, east of Tokyo, and caused extensive power outages.

If it was a really good wind, Hagibis would erase the muscle memory of every combatant, replacing it with a “must tackle low” obsession, so in the playoff stages the RWC can flower like Japanese cherry trees.

The capital's main airports, Haneda and Narita, stopped flights from landing and connecting trains were suspended, forcing the cancellation of more than a thousand flights.

Lets have Hagibis then stymie World Rugby attempts to fly in a few more tonnes of their pesky cards, so the quarterfinals have to go ahead with 15 players against 15 players; rugby as God intended.

Train operators suspended bullet train services extensively, while many train and subway lines in Tokyo were also down for most of Saturday. Usually bustling entertainment and shopping districts such as Shibuya and Ginza were deserted.

It was the host with the most, big crowds and impressive stadia. Only the weather has been like a Tomas Lavanini shoulder to the nose, with ball-soaping humidity and a tumultuous typhoon.

Tokyo Disneyland was closed on Saturday, its first weather-related closure since 1984, and supermarkets ran out of bottled water, batteries and other disaster-related goods.

And now we know that Plan B = cancel the rugby, deflate the mood, upset sides clinging to their Cup dreams by a thread, send Italian hero Sergio Parisse into retirement on a flat note.

Many people in and around Tokyo took shelter in temporary evacuation facilities early, before the worst of the storm arrived.

OPINION: Having never organised a Rugby World Cup Im loath to point out its failings. But, I do have vast experience as a purchaser of dodgy consumer goods, so here we go.

Yuka Ikemura, a 24-year-old nursery school teacher, was in one such facility at a community centre in eastern Tokyo with her three-year-old son, eight-month-old daughter and their pet rabbit.

3 dead, 11 missing as powerful Typhoon Hagibis rips through Japan

"I've got small children to take care of and we live on the first floor of an old apartment," Ikemura told Reuters.

"We brought with us the bare necessities. I'm scared to think about when we will have run out of diapers and milk."

Japanese Formula One Grand Prix organizers cancelled all practice and qualifying sessions scheduled for Saturday. Two matches of the Rugby World Cup due to be played on Saturday — including a matched between Canada and Namibia — were also cancelled.

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Deadly Typhoon Hagibis lashes Japan, millions told to evacuate

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